The Collection Quilt

This week I finished sewing The Collection Quilt by Carolyn Friedlander.  This quilt is created as a “Block of the Month” style quilt embracing the slow sewing movement- most of the design is hand sewn using needle turn appliqué.  I am really excited about this quilt, and I am even more excited to be teaching this project next year at one of my very favorite local quilt shops, Sew to Speak, in Columbus, Ohio.The Collection Quilt

The class will be held once a month for ten months.  Prior to the first class, we are scheduling a day that I will be in the shop if you would like to discuss the project and fabric selection.

My original fabric pull with the pattern and a colored sketch to help with fabric placement

My original fabric pull with the pattern and a colored sketch to help with fabric placement

The pattern includes a line drawing of the quilt that can be colored in to help with color and fabric choices.  We will have a few color schemes to look at, or you can create your own- this quilt has almost endless possibilities!  (I’m thinking about doing one with a lot of pink the next time around!)

The first nine classes will focus on one section each.  The tenth class will cover final quilt top assembly, discussion of quilting options/techniques, and binding.  Carolyn Friedlander has written this pattern to be very friendly to anyone just starting hand appliqué by gradually introducing new variations in each block.

Section one focuses on learning basting and the appliqué stitch on straight lines.

Collection Quilt Section 1

Section 1

Section two introduces convex curves and allows for a lot of creativity in fabric choices.

Collection Quilt Section 2

Section 2

In section three you will learn reverse appliqué along concave curves.

Collection Quilt Section 3

Section 3

Section four teaches you to stitch to an interior point.  You also have the opportunity to experiment with additional fabric substrates.  In the sample I used a lightweight denim and a cotton/silk blend.

Collection Quilt Section 4

Section 4

Corners are added in section five.

Collection Quilt Section 5

Section 5

Section six combines straight lines, corners, and curves in reverse appliqué.

Collection Quilt Section 6

Section 6

In section seven you will experience overlapping pieces.

Collection Quilt Section 7

Section 7

Section eight includes several acute angles

Collection Quilt Section 8

Section 8

Finally, in section nine, you will create the design with narrow strips of fabric, and reverse appliqué created from cutting slits into the upper layer of fabric.

Section 9

Section 9

By adding new skills with each section, you will be able to make the quilt without becoming overwhelmed.  With the block completed, the final quilt top goes together quickly.Collection Quilt Top

I quilted this project on my longarm using an edge to edge computerized design that I created.  I thought that the linear aesthetic complemented the graphic quality of the pattern.  This quilt (like most :) ) looks even better in person, so if you are in central Ohio, I hope you will stop by Sew to Speak to have a look at it.  Maybe you will even sign up for the class!Collection Quilt Detail

Quilt Stats

Title:  The Collection Quilt (Designed by Carolyn Friedlander)

Size: 40.5″ x 51.5″

Techniques:  Needle turn appliqué, machine piecing

Quilting:  Computerized linear edge to edge pattern (my original design) done on an A-1 Elite longarm

Fabric:  High quality quilting cotton, including many prints designed by Carolyn Friedlander, lightweight cotton denim, a cotton/silk blend satin.

Batting:  Warm and White cotton batting

Thread:  Appliqué and final machine piecing done using Gutermann Mara 100 in grey, quilted with 50wt Cotton WonderFil in white

Binding:  Grey Carolyn Friedlander and Cotton and Steel Prints, cut on the bias in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back.

Goal #21 is finished!

Goal #21 is finished!


Cotton and Steel Quilted Purse

This week I managed another finish for my Second Quarter Finish Along.  This purse was pretty far along already, so it really didn’t take too long to finish, and I am thrilled with the result.

Cotton and Steel purse exterior view

I had made a similar quilted bag last summer and have been carrying it ever since.  I liked the design pretty well, but I did make a few modifications this time around.  The new bag is slightly wider and deeper, although the height is the same.  Depending on how things would shift within the previous purse, it could be difficult to remove larger items such as my wallet, so the size change has helped immensely.  The last time around, I made the exterior pockets almost exactly the same size as the base bag, which meant that it was sometime a bit tight getting my keys or phone into those pockets.  This time I allowed for more ease, and it seams to be working well- nothing is falling out, but is much more easily accessible.  The interior pocket of the new bag is also sewn in so that there is an additional pocket created behind the zippered pouch.

Cotton and Steel purse interior

All of the fabrics are Cotton and Steel.  I could hardly wait to get my hands on this Viewfinders fabric from Melody Miller’s Playful line, and I paired it with the Hotcross Buns print from Rashida Coleman-Hale’s Mochi line.  The interior pocket is made of a Kimberly Kight Homebody print and lined with a red print from the Cotton and Steel Basics line.  I found this fantastic trim at a quilt show to finish off the exterior pockets, but it had been cut and packaged, so I’m not sure who designed it.  Does anyone recognize it?  I love that it incorporates so many colors that are in the viewfinder print.

Cotton and Steel purse detail

 

The quilting design is concentric circles which were randomly placed around a large fabric sandwich.  Once the quilting was done, I then cut out the individual pieces for the purse.  The main sides of the purse, the exterior pockets and the bottom of the bag are all quilted using Warm and White cotton batting.  The handles are strengthened with woven iron on interfacing, and the top of the purse and interior pockets are lined, but have no additional support.  The top and bottom edges of the bag are finished with bias tape which helps the bag keep its shape.

I have been carrying this bag for a few days now, and I am really loving it.  There may be more bags like this in my sewing future!

 

Goal #15 is Finished!

Goal #15 is Finished!