Modern Log Cabin Quilt

When I first decided that I wanted to return to quilting, I wanted to create a piece which had been floating around in the back of my mind for awhile.  Modern Log Cabin Quilt

Several years ago I had been to an exhibit at The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut which included a “potholder” quilt from around the Civil War.  A potholder quilt is created by quilting and binding individual blocks before whip stitching them together to form a quilt.  This technique was popular during the US Civil War for group quilts made to send to soldiers.  Each person working on the project could piece, quilt, and bind individual blocks.  When the group would meet, they could whip stitch the blocks together and quickly produce a finished quilt.

This quilting technique would work well in a modern context because:

  • The individually bound blocks naturally create a quilt which has a design on both the front and back of the quilt- Its like getting two quilts for the work of one!
  • Since much of the design comes from the binding of the blocks, you can really show off some of those gorgeous fabrics that are available to us now.
  • It is completely plausible to quilt even the largest quilts on a domestic sewing machine using this technique since you are only quilting a small portion at a time.
Modern Log Cabin Front View

Front View of “Modern Log Cabin”

I wanted my first project using this method to be fairly straightforward, but I didn’t want to go with a super traditional layout of square blocks either.  I landed on the idea of creating a modern Log Cabin block on a large scale.  Each “log” is its own bound block.

First, I drafted the layout for the quilt.  I planned accent strips (the orange stripes in the finished quilt) to add visual interest and create a natural place to seam fabric together for “logs” longer than the width of the fabric.  (I always try to design in necessary seams when I can!)/Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

Originally, I planned to unite the front and back of the quilt by making the accent pieces the same color as the reverse side of the quilt.  While selecting fabrics, I decided that both sides of the quilt wanted a jolt of color.  I went with an orange from Carolyn Friedlander’s collection since it worked well with both the grey and the blue sides of the quilt./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

For the quilting design I used straight line quilting paired with radiating arcs.Modern Log Cabin Quilting Detail

The binding is cut on the straight grain and each side is bound individually (rather than with mitered corners) as a nod to how quilts were sometimes bound in potholder quilts.  Side note- I still prefer doing bias with mitered corners.  I seriously considered how to join the blocks.  The traditional method would be hand whip stitching (I did this on the quilt Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win), but I wanted to experiment with using a sewing machine, so I selected a triple zig zag stitch.  Modern Log Cabin Detail

This quilt came together pretty easily, and I am really happy with the result.  I finished this quilt back in September, but I hadn’t gotten around to sharing it yet.  Today seemed to be a good day to share because I recently found out that this quilt will be exhibited in the Modern Quilt Category at the American Quilter’s Society Show in Paducah, Kentucky this April!  I have been to this show a few times (and as a high school student had a couple of garments in the fashion show there), but this is the first time I have had a quilt in a major show.  This was an awesome surprise since I almost didn’t enter this quilt!  (I had also entered Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win, which was not accepted even though I thought that it would have a much better chance.  It is so hard to tell what each show is looking for in a given year.  For now, I guess I will keep entering shows with a couple different style quilts and just see what happens- It can’t hurt, right?)

Back View of "Modern Log Cabin"

Back View of “Modern Log Cabin”

Quilt Stats

Title:  Modern Log Cabin

Size:  53″x63″

Techniques:  Bound Blocks (Potholder Technique), Machine Pieced and Quilted

Quilting:  Straight Line and Radiating Arcs

Fabric:  Assorted Cotton Prints

Batting:  Warm and Natural Cotton Batting

Thread:  White Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Cotton print, cut on grain in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

  • Bound block technique
  • On grain binding
  • Binding each side individually (no miters)

I’ll be linking this quilt post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, and Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict.  Please take a few moments to stop in and see all of the lovely projects being shared!


Catch a Falling Star: Mini Quilt #9

Late last week, I was finishing up the top for this starburst quilt, and I couldn’t help saving some of the trimmings from squaring up the sides of the quilt.  I combined these bits of fabric with the extra cut fabric from the quilt to create this mini quilt.

Catch a Falling Star Front Full View

The back of the quilt is also made of scraps from creating the larger quilt.

Catch a Falling Star Back

I have been wanting to do some matchstick quilting, and I thought that this type of quilting would look good with the design of both the front and back of the quilt.  I wanted to use the stitching to draw the various colors throughout the piece, so I selected three different thread colors to help achieve this.Catch a Falling Star Detail

For the binding, I cut Cotton and Steel fabric on the bias so that one row of dots would show along the edge of the quilt front and the back would have a polka dot effect.  While the binding was cut from left over fabric from the starburst quilt, it was the only part of the project not from extra cut pieces.

Catch a Falling Star Back Binding

Quilt Stats

Title:  Catch a Falling Star

Size: 11″x22.25″

Techniques:  Improvisational Piecing

Quilting:  Matchstick quilting done with a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Scrap Prints and Batiks, white Kona Cotton

Batting:  Warm and White cotton batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100 in white.  Quilted using Connecting Threads Essential cotton quilting thread in Magenta, Sangria, and Persimmon.

Binding:  Cotton and Steel fabric, cut on the bias in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

Using scraps exclusively from one larger project

Quilt 9 / 50

Quilt 9 / 50

Goal #8 is Finished!

Goal #8 is Finished!

I’ll be linking this post up with Oh Scrap! at Quilting is More Fun Than Housework and Scraptastic Tuesday at She Can Quilt.  Please stop by to see all of the lovely projects being shared!

Sweet and Simple Hashtag Quilt

My goals for 2015 include developing patterns and teaching quilting classes.  It seems that there is a big call for simple (but not boring) quilts of a manageable size.  I have really been enjoying coming up with a couple sweet and simple quilts that use squares, half square triangles, and strip piecing.  What one symbol is more contemporary than the hashtag?  Hashtag Front

There are four different fabrics in this sweet little quilt.  The main fabric is Kona cotton and there are three different low volume prints that make up the hashtag symbols.Hashtag Front Detail

I chose to quilt this project with a quarter circle arc.  This shape resembles the wifi symbol, and therefore connects with the dominant symbol of the hashtag.

Hashtag Back

In retrospect, I wish I had used a print on the back of the quilt to mix things up a bit.  Of course this quilt goes together so easily and looks so cute, I may have to make a few more!

Back Detail

Quilt Stats

Title:  Sweet and Simple Hashtag

Size:  40″x40″

Techniques:  Machine pieced, Machine Quilted

Quilting:  Echoing Quarter Circle Arc pattern done with a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Kona Cotton and Low Volume Prints

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with Connecting Threads Essential Cotton Quilting thread in Sangria

Binding:  Kona Cotton matching the quilt background, cut on the bias in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back.

I am linking this post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict, Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She, and Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts.  Please stop by to see all of the lovely work being shared!


Free-Motion Whole Cloth: Mini Quilt #8

Did you know that a whole cloth quilt used to be a sign of wealth?  If you could afford to purchase an entire piece of fabric for your quilt rather than piecing together scraps you must be rich!  I think this quilt is too small to demonstrate wealth (hah!), but it is the perfect size to help me work on my free motion quilting.Whole Cloth

One of my big goals for 2015 is to improve my free-motion quilting.  As we close in on the halfway point of the first quarter (yikes!), I decided to move forward with this goal by doing a free motion quilted whole cloth mini.  Wholecloth Detail B

I drew a 2″ grid on the upper layer of fabric and sketched in the “stems” of the feathers.  I started with the feathers and then began filling the surrounding areas with different quilting designs.  My goal was to get some more practice with a variety of patterns, so I used different designs in various areas of the quilt.  For this project I decided I would work with whatever happened- no ripping out stitches!Wholecloth Detail A

Since my free motion quilting skills are still a work in progress, I stuck with white thread on a white background, but I do hope to try contrasting stitching at some point.  For the first time, I used a double layer of batting.  The bottom layer is Warm and White and the top layer is Hobbs Heirloom Cotton batting.  I really like the feel and dimension that the double layer of batting provides.  The Warm and White feels very stable and the Hobbs cotton batting is lighter and “poof-ier” which really seems to help the design pop.

Quilt Stats

Title:  Whole Cloth Sampler One

Size:  19″x20″ after washing

Techniques:  Whole cloth quilting

Quilting:  Feathers, Pebbles, Double Pebbles, Circles, Angular Swirls, Waves

Fabrics:  Front, Back, and Binding of White Kona Cotton

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting and Hobbs Heirloom Bleached Cotton Batting

Thread:  White Signature Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Continuous 2″ wide bias of white Kona Cotton, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was New:

Whole cloth quilting

Using a double layer of batting

Quilt 8 / 50

Quilt 8 / 50

Goal #7 is Finished!

Goal #7 is Finished!

I’m linking up with Finish It Up Friday at Crazy Mom Quilts, Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict, and Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She.  Please stop by to see all of the wonderful work being created!

 


Repeat with a Twist: Mini Quilt #7

I have had Flying Geese blocks and configurations on my mind lately, and when I sat down to plan out this week’s mini quilt I fully intended to work out something with Flying Geese.  That did not happen.  I have one drafting file that contains all of my mini quilt designs, and somewhere along the line I became distracted by a design that I had started awhile back.Repeat with a Twist

This pattern started with inspiration from a historic quilt I saw in Four Centuries of Quilts:  The Colonial Williamsburg Collection.    (Not an affiliate link- I just really like this book!)  I don’t want to violate any copyrights by putting an image up, but if you have the book, the inspiration is a corner from the quilt on page 147.  I have seriously reworked this concept, so this is definitely not a reproduction, but a Repeat with a (considerable) Twist.

As with any quilt that I pattern prior to construction, I started with a line drawing./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Quilt/Quilt Designs A.dwg

I worked out quite a few possible color schemes.  These are just a few I considered.  I ended up deciding to use the one in the upper right./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Quilt/Quilt Designs A.dwg

I originally thought solids would be best for this project, but I didn’t have solids for all of the colors I wanted to use in my stash, so I went with all prints.  I like the result, but I still like the idea of making this quilt up with solids.Repeat with a Twist Detail B

For the backing of the quilt I combined scraps from constructing the front of the quilt with a larger piece from Carolyn Friedlander’s Botanic line.Repeat with a Twist Back

Since this quilt is so heavily linear in the pieced design, I thought it would be interesting to juxtapose all those straight lines with curves in the quilting.  I ended up going with interlocking circles for the quilting because I liked that they are still graphic while bringing a bit of softness to the design.Repeat with a Twist Detail C

Quilt Stats:

Title:  Repeat with a Twist

Size:  12.5″x18.5″

Techniques:  Machine Piecing

Quilting:  Interlocking circles done with a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  100% cotton prints

Batting:  Warm and White

Thread:  Pieced with white Gutermann Mara 100.  Quilted with Mettler cotton quilting thread in Orange, Connecting Threads Essential cotton quilting thread in Peridot and Persian Blue.

Binding:  2″ wide bias cut strips from Doe fabric line.  Machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

  • A new design!
  • Using a specific historic quilt as inspiration
Quilt 7 / 50

Quilt 7 / 50

Goal #6 is Finished!

Goal #6 is Finished!

I’m linking this post up with Finish it up Friday at Crazy Mom Quilts, Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict, Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, and Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She.