Beautiful Ohio Row by Row

The international shop hop, Row by Row, starts tomorrow!  This is the third year I have designed the row for one of my local quilt shops, Dabble and Stitch, which is located in Columbus, Ohio.  The patterns for all blocks in the Row by Row are available for free at participating shops, and kits are for sale if you would like to use the same fabrics as the sample blocks.  This year’s theme is “Sew Musical.”

Beautiful Ohio Finished

The official state song for Ohio is “Beautiful Ohio,” and this song is the starting point for the row.  I located the sheet music for the song, and placed a circle over each note for the signature phrase.  When these notes are connected they formed the shape of the rolling hills of central Ohio.

Beautiful Ohio detail 1

Simple foundation paper piecing is used to construct the main portion of the block, and the circles and wording are added with applique.  I chose to use needle turn applique, but I included additional lines on the templates for raw edge applique, so each person can choose which process to use.

Beautiful Ohio detail 2

“Sew Musical” was a particularly challenging theme since music is experienced mostly through your sense of hearing and quilting is a visual and tactile medium.  The quilting stitches provided an opportunity to add much needed movement to the block.  A spiral of quilting emanates from each circle, and once the spirals intersect, echo stitching completes the machine quilting.  To add a different rhythmic feel to the piece, large stitch hand quilting is added between lines of machine stitching.  Several colors of thread in 12wt and 28wt were used to complete the project.

Beautiful Ohio back detail

Facings finish the edges of the sample block.  Since this block captures just a single phrase of the song, I wanted to allow the lines of the design to continue without a visual frame.

Beautiful Ohio back

Quilt Stats

Title:  Beautiful Ohio

Size: 9″ x 36″

Techniques:  Foundation Paper Piecing, Needle Turn Applique

Quilting:  Machine echo quilting using a walking foot on a Bernina 1008 domestic and large stitch hand quilting

Fabric:  Assorted cotton prints and solids

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool

Thread: Quilted with 50wt, 28wt, and 12wt cotton Aurifil in multiple colors

Binding:  Faced with print matching the quilt backing

Bonus!

Here are the blocks I have designed in previous in previous years.  Both patterns are still available through Dabble and Stitch.

2016 Theme:  Home Sweet Home

Columbus Skyline

Quilted Columbus Skyline Row Mini

2017 Theme: On the Go!

Lane Avenue Bridge

Lane Ave Bridge Full

I’m an Aurifil Artisan!

I am so excited that I am now able to tell you that I am an Aurifil Artisan for 2018!  Aurifil is my favorite quilting thread, and I use it on both my domestic and long arm machines.  White is probably my most used thread color, but I tend to use lots of bright colors too.  Did you notice that I actually have three CONES of bright pink thread?!  And yes, I do need that much!

Aurifil Spools

You may have noticed that I love to incorporate colorful threads as major design elements.  Here are a few of my favorites.  The first, Resonance, was in the Aurifil booth at Quilt Market this Spring.

Resonance front view

Pivoted Plaid is now touring with the Best of QuiltCon Exhibit.

Pivoted Plaid

Infused Plaid is one of my all time favorites, and it was included in the Modern Quilt Guild book, Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century.  For this quilt, I designed the quilting design before I designed the piecing of the quilt top.

Quilt Show

Looking back a little further, The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts, was the first quilt that I began embracing the use of thread as a major design element.

The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

The Whole is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

I already have more designs in the works that will highlight thread as a major design element, and I can hardly wait to get started!  Hopefully, I’ll be adding a lot more empty spools to my collection this year!

Empty Spools

Synthesized Slivers

A few weeks ago, I came across a call for entries for the Modern Mini Quilt Challenge hosted by Quilt Expo.  It has been awhile since I have done a mini quilt, and I was feeling the need for a relatively quick finish, so I jumped in.  One of my friends has been giving me a hard time about my extreme dislike of brown fabric, so I decided this would be a good challenge to incorporate my least favorite color.

Synthesized Slivers front

My initial fabric pull centered around a stack of quilter’s denim made by Art Gallery Fabrics.  I had received the fat quarter bundle during QuiltCon 2017, and I had been waiting for the perfect project to come up.  I love the utilitarian texture the fabric has and the value shifts between fabrics were seamless.  I did add a few other fabrics in to serve as accent pieces.  These included a bright green solid, metallic linen, and a silk/cotton blend.

Synthesized Slivers Fabric Pull

I started the quilt by constructing small blocks in a variety of sizes using background fabrics in a range of colors and values.  The slivers of accent fabrics finish at 1/8″ wide.  I used a ruler to cut the slits in straight lines, but only actually measured to square up each block after the slivers were added.

Synthesized Slivers process

At this point, my friend saw the progress and informed me that tan is most definitely NOT Brown, even though I still insist that it is ;).  In keeping with the challenge, I went out and purchased a small cut of chocolate brown Kona.  There wasn’t a speck of true brown in any of my stash!

Synthesized Slivers quilt top

After constructing a few more blocks, I started putting everything together.  I think this is the most challenging part of the process, but this top came together, and only required a couple partial seams.

Synthesized Slivers with Monty

Monty is my cat that demands likes to be held constantly.  I was taking photos right after he had woken up from his first afternoon nap, and he really wanted my attention!  If you manage to look past the cat, you can see the back of the quilt top.  I made sure to press all of the sliver seam allowances toward the background to make the slivers recede a bit.

Synthesized Slivers back of quilt top with monty

This is a small quilt so I quickly pin basted it and selected six colors of Aurifil to match the background fabrics.

Synthesized Slivers thread choices

I wanted to accentuate the angles that are incorporated into the design, so I used echo quilting to highlight the design of each block.

Synthesized Slivers quilting detail

The back is the same bright green accent color used on the front of the quilt.  I like how the different thread colors add value shifts to the back of the quilt.  I didn’t want to frame the quilt in with a binding, so the edges are finished with facings to match the backing fabric.

Synthesized Slivers back

I am so glad that I made this quilt, and even I think the brown actually works in it!

Synthesized Slivers angled quilting detail

 

Quilt Stats

Title:  Synthesized Slivers

Size: 22″ x 19″

Techniques:  Machine Piecing, Improvisational Piecing

Quilting:  Echo quilting using a walking foot on a Bernina 1008 domestic

Fabric:  Art Gallery Quilter’s Denim, Kona Cotton, Metallic Blend, Silk/Cotton Blend

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool

Thread: Quilted with 50wt cotton Aurifil in six colors

Binding:  Faced with Kona Cotton matching the quilt backing

Craftsy Quilt Designer Fellowship Finalist!

The finalists for this year’s Craftsy Quilt Designer Fellowship were announced today, and I am thrilled to be one of the top ten!  The second round is public voting, so I hope you check out all the entries and vote on the Craftsy Quilt Blog.  All of the finalists make fabulous work and represent a wide range of styles, so it is definitely worth checking out!

Craftsy Quilt Design Fellowship 2018

Each finalist has three of their submitted photographs and an excerpt of their statement included in the voting.  The original statements were up to 400 words, so this is definitely a good choice for voting, but if you would like to see all of the quilt photos I submitted and my full statement, you can keep reading!

I submitted six quilt photos:

Infused Plaid

Infused Plaid

iSpy

ispy_f

Columbus Block of the Month 2017 with 12 blocks representing specific locations in an abstract way

Around Town

Raise the Roof

Raise the Roof front

Lateral Ascension

Lateral Ascension full

Overlay

Overlay front view

And here is my full statement:

My goal as a designer is to elevate the ordinary.  I seek inspiration in both the unusual and the mundane.  My training as a theatrical scenic and costume designer influences my approach to quilt design, and allows me to reinterpret the patterns and rhythms of the world around me.  When designing, I locate and isolate specific aspects of an environment, then combine them in unexpected ways.  This process creates a strong abstraction of the original inspiration without being a direct representation.

I am currently a longarm quilter, designer, blogger, and local quilting teacher.  My quilts have been juried into numerous internationally recognized shows, and several have won awards at major shows.  These awards include the first place award in the Modern Category at AQS-Paducah in 2016 and 2017, a first place at QuiltCon 2017, and a third at QuiltCon 2018.  One of my quilts, Pivoted Plaid, will be traveling with the Best of QuiltCon exhibit this year.  Another quilt, Infused Plaid, was included in the book, Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century.

I have designed fourteen patterns for a local quilt shop which are inspired by local landmarks, and have had several projects published in magazines, including a quilt that is currently on the cover of Modern Patchwork.

Patterns can function as a stand alone project, but they can also be a tool to teach and empower the maker.  Many of my patterns are written as skill builder patterns which are intended to walk the maker through a new technique step by step and help them develop confidence that increases as they move on to other patterns using the same technique.

Skill Builder Patterns may incorporate techniques for:

  • Accurate machine piecing and pressing to enhance the quilt
  • Foundation paper piecing
  • Applique
  • Using quilting to enhance the design of a quilt

Producing printed patterns with a wider distribution is a major goal that this fellowship would assist with.  I look forward to sharing my work and inspiring makers across the quilting community!

One of my major goals was to apply for everyone I want this year, and this application was a part of this goal.  It is a definite honor to have my work side by side with so many talented individuals!

 

QuiltCon Highlights

QuiltCon 2018 ended on Sunday, and I wish that I had been able to attend to see so many of my quilt-y friends.  I thoroughly enjoyed seeing all of the photos and videos which were posted during the week, and it was wonderful to be able to see most of the show virtually.  Thank you so much to everyone who took the time to post during the show!  If you haven’t seen many photos of the show, I suggest looking at the Instagram hashtags #quiltcon2018 and #quiltcon to see most of the quilts on display.  Since I wasn’t there, my personal highlights will be pretty short.

1. Even though I wasn’t there, four of my quilts were able to attend in my place!

QuiltCon 2018 Collage

2.  Lateral Ascension received a third place award in the minimalism category!  I have a tendency to struggle with minimalism, so this was a big accomplishment on a personal level.

Lateral Ascension full

3.  Pivoted Plaid is going to be included in the Best of QuiltCon 2018 Traveling Exhibit!  It is thrilling that this quilt will be shared around the country in the coming year!

Pivoted Plaid

So who’s ready for QuiltCon 2019?  Nashville is an easy drive from here, so I will definitely be there next year, along with a lot of my local Modern Quilt Guild!