Resonance: A 100 Day Quilt Project

My 100 Day Quilt project was a success, and I want to thank everyone who followed the progress on Instagram!  Resonance is the ultimate result.  It was named in reference to the quilting stitches which echo out from a central point.  If you would like to know more about the start of the project, check out the first post about the 100 Day Circle Quilt Project.

Resonance front view

Constructing the blocks for the quilt took the most time- 89 days.  Most blocks had two-three concentric circles, but several included multiple circles set near each other.  Here are a couple of examples:

Block 89

Block 8

The next two days were spent trimming the blocks to their finished size.

Trimmed Blocks

Laying the quilt out was a bit tricky.  Since it was too large for my design wall, I cleared out the kitchen and arranged the blocks on the floor.  This photo was taken with my phone touching the ceiling, and I still couldn’t get far enough away to capture the entire quilt design.

Block Layout

After a couple more days, the quilt top was finished.

Quilt Top

There were 13 different colors of thread used to quilt the project.  A different thread was used for each fabric.  This extended the color beyond the edge of each circle, and ensured that the back, as well as the front of the quilt, would show each color change.  I knew that I would want lots of lines of stitching around each circle, so I decided to use 50wt thread so I could do lots of stitching without excessive thread build up.

Quilting Thread

Here is the quilt loaded and basted on the longarm.

Loaded Quilt

The quilting process took quite a long time.  I quilted each circle from the inside out to prevent bunching in the fabric, so there were a lot of thread changes.

Circle Quilting Process

Once the circles were quilted, I did large scale bubble quilting in the background.

Quilting Process

 

Resonance Detail 1

 

Angled Quilting Detail

There were more than a million quilting stitches in this project.  I’m pretty sure that is a personal record!

Stitch Counter

The binding is mostly white, with some sporadic shots of color.

Binding

I love the way the back of the quilt looks!

Resonance back view

To cap it off, Aurifil asked to use this quilt in their booth at Spring Market this past weekend!  This is my first quilt to be included at a Quilt Market, so I was very excited!

Photo courtesy of Sylvia of Flying Parrot Quilts

Photo courtesy of Sylvia of Flying Parrot Quilts

Photo courtesy of Aurifil

Photo courtesy of Aurifil

Quilt Stats

Title:  Resonance

Size: 79″ x 79″

Techniques:  Hand Applique, Machine Piecing

Quilting:  Free motion quilting with an A-1 Longarm machine

Fabric:  Assorted solids and white-on-white prints

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool

Thread: Quilted with 50wt cotton Aurifil in 13 colors

Binding:  White Kona Cotton with colorful inserts, cut on the bias at 2″ wide, machine stitched to the front, hand finished

Zenith

Each year the Central Ohio Modern Quilt Guild issues a color challenge.  For the past two years the challenge has been the same: Combine the Pantone and Kona colors of the year into a single sewn object.  My project for last year’s challenge was an improv quilt inspired by the Franklin Park Conservatory.  The quilt I made for this year’s color challenge is also improv, but it is more structured this time around.

Zenith front

In 2018 the Pantone color of the year is Ultraviolet and the Kona color is Tiger Lily.  Among our group this combination had both lovers and haters.

2018 challenge colors

 

I could definitely see the potential, and wanted to embrace the violets while pushing the piece toward warmer tones.  The beginning of my fabric pull looked like this.

Zenith fabric pull

Around the time this challenge was issued, the Columbus Museum of Art was hosting a special exhibit which included this oil painting, The Bay of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, by Georges Lacombe which was painted around 1902-1904.  The color range in this painting was exactly what I had imagined when I saw the challenge colors.

Georges Lacombe painting

The quilt top was constructed using structured improv- I measured and used rulers, but the placement of each piece of fabric was determined on the fly.  About 2/3 of the quilt went together quickly, but the lower left corner was problematic.

Zenith process 1

 

Zenith process 2

After over a month of struggling with it, I finally came to terms with the fact that I just didn’t have the right pink fabrics to complete the top.  (How could I possibly be lacking pink of all colors!)  Once I added more pink solids to the palette, the top was easy to finish.

Since the quilting is done on a 120 degree angle, and the piece isn’t particularly large, I decided it would be easier to do the quilting with a walking foot on my domestic machine.  It is almost matchstick quilted.  The machine stitching is randomly spaced from 1/8″ to 1/2.”  Once the machine quilting was finished, I added large stitch hand quilting in the larger gaps between the machine stitching.  It was important to me that the quilting stitches add personality to the quilt, so I used a range of thread colors and weights.  By the time the quilting was finished I had incorporated 50wt, 40wt, 28wt, and 12wt thread into the quilt.

Zenith detail 1

Zenith detail 2

Zenith detail 3

The majority of the fabrics used in the quilt are solids, but there are a few prints worked into the design.  One of those prints, a Tula Pink stripe, was perfect for a bias binding.  I combined this print with some yellow solids to finish off the quilt.

Zenith binding

Quilt Stats

Title:  Zenith

Size: 53″ x 69″

Techniques:  Machine Piecing, Structured Improvisational Piecing

Quilting:  Almost-Matchstick machine quilting on a Bernina 1008 domestic, large stitch hand quilting

Fabric:  Assorted quilt shop quality, 100% cotton solid and print fabrics, and backing of wide-back Tula Pink Print

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool

Thread: Quilted with 50wt, 40wt, 28wt, and 12wt cotton Aurifil

Binding:  Tula Pink stripes and yellow solids, cut on the bias at 2″ wide, machine stitched to the front, hand finished

This quilt is entered in the Pantone Color of the Year Challenge at Bryan House Quilts and No Hats in the House.  Click the links to check out all of the fabulous entries!  My country of residence in the United States.

QuiltCon Highlights

QuiltCon 2018 ended on Sunday, and I wish that I had been able to attend to see so many of my quilt-y friends.  I thoroughly enjoyed seeing all of the photos and videos which were posted during the week, and it was wonderful to be able to see most of the show virtually.  Thank you so much to everyone who took the time to post during the show!  If you haven’t seen many photos of the show, I suggest looking at the Instagram hashtags #quiltcon2018 and #quiltcon to see most of the quilts on display.  Since I wasn’t there, my personal highlights will be pretty short.

1. Even though I wasn’t there, four of my quilts were able to attend in my place!

QuiltCon 2018 Collage

2.  Lateral Ascension received a third place award in the minimalism category!  I have a tendency to struggle with minimalism, so this was a big accomplishment on a personal level.

Lateral Ascension full

3.  Pivoted Plaid is going to be included in the Best of QuiltCon 2018 Traveling Exhibit!  It is thrilling that this quilt will be shared around the country in the coming year!

Pivoted Plaid

So who’s ready for QuiltCon 2019?  Nashville is an easy drive from here, so I will definitely be there next year, along with a lot of my local Modern Quilt Guild!

 

Raise the Roof

I made a pretty quilt!  I very rarely make a quilt that I would call “pretty”- typically I describe my work with terms like graphic, clean, dynamic, or vivid.  Raise the Roof is an exception to this trend.

Raise the Roof front

Inspiration for Raise the Roof came from the architecture of the Horticulture Building on the grounds of the Ohio State Fair.  The low volume background of the blocks echos the design of the rafters of the building, and the central stars are an abstract representation of the over-sized ceiling fans.

Horticulture Rafters

Horticulture Fans

The pink, violet, and orange blocks appear to spin around the focal blocks in blue and orange.

Raise the Roof Focal Blocks

Value plays a huge role in the design of the quilt blocks.  The colors in the low volume background triangles have the same placement in each block segment, but the brightly colored star tips change depending on the block placement.  Intentional placement of a dark and light version of each color on every point creates a three dimensional look.

Raise the Roof Sample Blocks

After creating a few sample blocks, I decided to submit the design to Modern Patchwork.  I was thrilled to have it accepted, and quickly finished the top.  For the quilting design, I chose an all-over organic free motion design with a botanical flavor.

Raise the Roof back

The juxtaposition of the organic quilting lines on the regimented, foundation paper pieced quilt top reminds me of the relationship between the beautiful floral displays against the architecture of the building.  To make the quilting stand out even more, I used double batting for the first time.  The top layer is a yummy Hobbs Tuscany Wool, and the bottom layer is Hobbs 80/20.

Raise the Roof detail

To top it all off, this quilt made the cover of the magazine!  This is a first for me, and I am over the moon!

00_MP7MarApr18_Cover_web

 

You can get your very own copy of the March/April Modern patchwork here!

Quilt Stats

Title:  Raise the Roof

Size: 59″ x 59″

Techniques:  Foundation Paper Piecing, Traditional Piecing

Quilting:  Hand guided, mixed motif free motion quilting done on an A-1 Elite Longarm

Fabric:  Assorted quilt shop quality, 100% cotton fabrics, and backing of wide-back Kona Cotton

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool and Hobbs 80/20

Thread:  Pieced using light grey Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with 50wt cotton Aurifil

Binding:  Cotton and Steel grey and silver dot bias binding, machine stitched to the front, hand finished on the back.

National Backwards Day!

Today, January 31 is National Backwards Day!  I decided to celebrate by taking a closer look at the back of some quilts and quilt tops.

The backs of quilt tops hardly ever get the glory that they deserve.  Here are some hand appliquéd circles . . .

Circle Applique back

And some machine pieced circles . . .

Stroll back

I love when the quilting transfers the design of the quilt to the back of the project.

Row by Row Back

 

Overlay Back

Franklin Park back

 

Sometimes the design isn’t completely transferred to the back of the quilt, but you can get a general idea of the quilt front.

Customer Quilt back

Pin Mini back

 

Occasionally I do simple, light quilting . . .

Simple Mini Quilt BackBut more often it’s heavy quilting that shows on the back of my quilts . . .  (these two mini quilts are the same design)

Star Block Back

 

Recently I even tried out using doubled batting, which really made the quilting design pop on the back of the quilt (as well as the front).

Secret Sewing Quilt Back

I frequently love the backs of quilts as much as the front!