Raise the Roof

I made a pretty quilt!  I very rarely make a quilt that I would call “pretty”- typically I describe my work with terms like graphic, clean, dynamic, or vivid.  Raise the Roof is an exception to this trend.

Raise the Roof front

Inspiration for Raise the Roof came from the architecture of the Horticulture Building on the grounds of the Ohio State Fair.  The low volume background of the blocks echos the design of the rafters of the building, and the central stars are an abstract representation of the over-sized ceiling fans.

Horticulture Rafters

Horticulture Fans

The pink, violet, and orange blocks appear to spin around the focal blocks in blue and orange.

Raise the Roof Focal Blocks

Value plays a huge role in the design of the quilt blocks.  The colors in the low volume background triangles have the same placement in each block segment, but the brightly colored star tips change depending on the block placement.  Intentional placement of a dark and light version of each color on every point creates a three dimensional look.

Raise the Roof Sample Blocks

After creating a few sample blocks, I decided to submit the design to Modern Patchwork.  I was thrilled to have it accepted, and quickly finished the top.  For the quilting design, I chose an all-over organic free motion design with a botanical flavor.

Raise the Roof back

The juxtaposition of the organic quilting lines on the regimented, foundation paper pieced quilt top reminds me of the relationship between the beautiful floral displays against the architecture of the building.  To make the quilting stand out even more, I used double batting for the first time.  The top layer is a yummy Hobbs Tuscany Wool, and the bottom layer is Hobbs 80/20.

Raise the Roof detail

To top it all off, this quilt made the cover of the magazine!  This is a first for me, and I am over the moon!

00_MP7MarApr18_Cover_web

 

You can get your very own copy of the March/April Modern patchwork here!

Quilt Stats

Title:  Raise the Roof

Size: 59″ x 59″

Techniques:  Foundation Paper Piecing, Traditional Piecing

Quilting:  Hand guided, mixed motif free motion quilting done on an A-1 Elite Longarm

Fabric:  Assorted quilt shop quality, 100% cotton fabrics, and backing of wide-back Kona Cotton

Batting:  Hobbs Tuscany Wool and Hobbs 80/20

Thread:  Pieced using light grey Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with 50wt cotton Aurifil

Binding:  Cotton and Steel grey and silver dot bias binding, machine stitched to the front, hand finished on the back.

Modern Patchwork Cover!

“Raise the Roof” has made the cover of the March/April Issue of Modern Patchwork!  This is the first time I have had a quilt make a magazine cover, so I am ecstatic!  I will be sharing more about this quilt closer to the magazine release date, February 27, 2018.  You will be able to get your copy from The Quilting Company.

00_MP7MarApr18_Cover_web

National Backwards Day!

Today, January 31 is National Backwards Day!  I decided to celebrate by taking a closer look at the back of some quilts and quilt tops.

The backs of quilt tops hardly ever get the glory that they deserve.  Here are some hand appliquéd circles . . .

Circle Applique back

And some machine pieced circles . . .

Stroll back

I love when the quilting transfers the design of the quilt to the back of the project.

Row by Row Back

 

Overlay Back

Franklin Park back

 

Sometimes the design isn’t completely transferred to the back of the quilt, but you can get a general idea of the quilt front.

Customer Quilt back

Pin Mini back

 

Occasionally I do simple, light quilting . . .

Simple Mini Quilt BackBut more often it’s heavy quilting that shows on the back of my quilts . . .  (these two mini quilts are the same design)

Star Block Back

 

Recently I even tried out using doubled batting, which really made the quilting design pop on the back of the quilt (as well as the front).

Secret Sewing Quilt Back

I frequently love the backs of quilts as much as the front!

 

Central Ohio Modern Quilt Guild Charity Quilt

Every year the Modern Quilt Guild issues a Charity Quilt Challenge and the results are displayed in the hallways of QuiltCon. The MQG gives a theme and color palette, and any guild or small group of members is invited to participate.  This is the second year the Central Ohio MQG has participated in this challenge.

Charity Quilt 2018 front

This year the theme was Modern Traditionalism and this is the palette.

QC18+Palette

When our guild does a group quilt, we gather design submissions and vote to determine which one we will make.  The design for this quilt was a collaboration between Lissa of Lovingly Lissa and me.  This project is a potholder style quilt, which was a popular method for charity quilts made in New England during the Civil War era.  Each contributor would piece, quilt and bind a block.  When the volunteers would gather, all they would have to do to finish the quilt is whip stitch the blocks together.  (If you would like to see some other potholder quilts, check out these posts:  Modern Log Cabin, Petals in the Wind, and In the Garden.)

Quilt Layout (2)

For our updated version of a potholder quilt, we used Ohio Star blocks.  This is the block that I contributed to the quilt.

Charity Quilt 2018 Individual Block front

Charity Quilt 2018 Individual Block back

Each block is constructed so that the pieced block is visible on either the front or the back of the quilt.  This also creates a fully reversible quilt.  The blocks are joined with a triple zigzag stitch done on my mechanical sewing machine.

Charity Quilt 2018 back

The first side of the quilt incorporates the entire color palette and has more of a “daytime” feel.

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 3

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 2

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 1

The reverse side of the quilt is intended to appear more like the nighttime sky.

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 4

 

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 5

 

Charity Quilt 2018 detail 6

My favorite part of this quilt is that we have so many different people contributing their personal quilting style to the project.  It has a mix of straight line and free motion quilting, several thread colors and weights, and various quilting densities.  It really became a beautiful representation of our guild.

The quilt gets shipped off to QuiltCon this week!  We are all very excited to have it displayed with all of the challenge quilts from around the world.  We don’t have any members who are able to attend this year, so we are hoping to have some photos come our way!

Quilt Stats:

Title:  Two Sides of the Same Star

Size: 71″ x 89″

Techniques:  Potholder style, machine pieced, block machine zigzagged together

Quilting:  Free motion and walking foot quilted

Fabric:  Kona Cottons

Batting:  Warm and White

Thread:  Pieced and quilted with a variety of thread brands, colors, and weights

Binding:  Blocks were individually bound with Kona cotton bias binding, cut 2″ wide, machine stitched to the front of each block, and hand stitched to the back.

Vinyl Front Tula Pouch

For the second year, one of the sewing groups I belong to did a swap.  This swap has a twist:  Each person brings a fat quarter of a favorite fabric from their stash to put in a bag.  Then, we all take turns pulling out a piece of fabric and guess who it belongs to.  We are a small group, so we are typically pretty successful in guessing the owner of the fabric.  We each take the fabric away and come back a couple meetings later with an item made from the fabric we pulled from the bag to give back to the original person.

Tula Vinyl Pouch front

I pulled this cute Tula Pink cat print from the bag of fat quarters.  It happened to be a fabric that I love enough to own, too!  The person who brought the fabric enjoys hand applique and embroidery, so I thought she may like a bag that will keep all of her pieces flat and visible until it is their turn to be secured to the block.

I used a fairly heavy, clear vinyl for the front of the pouch. The primary fabric is the cat print, and for the back of the pouch, I chose to make a nine patch from a charm pack from the same Tula Pink fabric line.  I sandwiched and quilted the fabric layers with a piece of soft and stable to make sure the pouch would lay flat while maintaining flexibility.

Tula Vinyl Pouch back

The binding is also from that same line of prints.  I machine stitched it to the front and folded it around to the back for hand stitching.  This allowed for hand finishing on the fabric portion of the pouch.  The bag finishes a bit over 13″ square, so a lot of quilt blocks could actually lay flat in the pouch.  I wish I had made one for myself when I was in a couple of bees- it would have been perfect to transport blocks!