Entries for QuiltCon 2018

QuiltCon 2018 is coming up in February, and Thursday was the last day for entries.  I always end up having one quilt that I either:

1) Have to make by the deadline – or

2) Allow to grow from a small project to a big one.

My Michael Miller Challenge quilt was definitely the second.  It was going to be a small-ish wall quilt, but it ended up being a generous lap quilt at 63″x69″.

Complementary Composition full

“Overlay” is my second entry and is entered in the Modern Traditionalism category.  This was also my entry in the Riley Blake Challenge earlier this year.  I really hope this one gets in- it is a personal favorite!

Overlay full

For my negative space entry, I continued exploring the idea of highlighting the use of thread to tell the story of the design.

Pivoted Plaid full

“Lateral Ascension” is entered in the Minimalism category.  The design is inspired by the drafted front elevation of a spiral staircase.

Lateral Ascension full

Franklin Park/Greenery in the Garden” is the only quilt I have actually written a more in depth post about.  It is entered into the Improvisational category.

Franklin Park full

Even though there is now a maximum number of five quilts accepted per entrant, I couldn’t resist adding a sixth entry.  I would love to share it with you, but it is a piece of secret sewing, so I will have to wait (and so will you!)

I have been away from the blog for awhile, and I am really missing it.  In the hopes of encouraging myself to make it more of a habit to blog, I am going to try participating in the 31 Day Blog Challenge hosted by Cheryl Sleboda at muppin.com.

BlogChallengeYr3-1

 

Building Bridges: January BOM

2017 is going to be an exciting quilting year, and one of the projects I am most excited for is working with a local shop, Dabble and Stitch, on a block of the month program.  Throughout the year we will “travel” in and around Columbus, Ohio, creating blocks that are designed to represent the neighborhoods that make up the larger community.

We are starting the year with the block, Building Bridges, which is inspired by the Lane Avenue Bridge that crosses the Olentangy River on the Ohio State University Campus.building-bridges-block-copy

Bridges are more than physical structures- they create vibrant communities in areas that a natural divide could easily separate people into different social, economic, and cultural districts. The location of this bridge on a university campus is particularly notable since academic institutions bring people from around the world to live and study together.

As a cable stayed suspension bridge, the structure has a strong, dynamic lines that make it a notable architectural feature of the area.  The medallions on the bridge are super eye catching.  (I travel by this bridge each time I go to Dabble and Stitch, and I secretly hope to have to stop at the light leading up to it so I can stare for a minute!)lane-avenue-bridge-collage

When designing this series of blocks, I want to make them representative, but in an abstract manner- sort of like how a log cabin quilt block abstractly represents the building of an actual log cabin.  My hope is that people both in and outside of Columbus find these designs both attractive and inspiring.

Each section of the Building Bridges Block represents an aspect of the Lane Avenue bridge.  The Stripes on one half of the block represent the sidewalks and street, the Olentangy River, and the bright red center of the decorative medallions.  There are three pairs of cable lines to represent the three bridges that have stood at this location.bridge-block-with-notes

This block is even more exciting when it is created in multiples.  Every other block is constructed as a mirror image of the original, and a couple fabric placements alter position to create a sense of depth.  When a set of four blocks come together, they form a full square which symbolizes different communities coming together as one.

The table topper version is comprised of four blocks./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Quilting/My Quilts/Block of the

16 blocks make up the baby or wall quilt./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Quilting/My Quilts/Block of the

You will need 48 blocks to construct the Twin sized version./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Quilting/My Quilts/Block of the

This pattern is available through Dabble and Stitch and includes instructions for a single block as well as the table topper, baby/wall quilt, and the twin sized version.  I am also very excited to be doing a class on this block next Sunday, January 15, so I hope to see some of you there!

I’m linking this post up with Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She.

The Collection Quilt (Round 2!)

Last year, I was thrilled to teach Carolyn Friedlander‘s Collection Quilt through a local quilt shop, Sew to Speak.  The first version I made as a class sample is similar to the overall aesthetic that was used in the original design, so when I constructed a second version to use for demonstration purposes, I thought it would be fun to do something entirely different.  This is my pink-loving-little-girl version!collection-quilt-2

My color palette this time around was mostly pinks and oranges with some red and violet and shots of green.

collection-quilt-2-detail-2

Some fussy cutting added a bit of whimsy to the overall aesthetic.collection-quilt-2-detail-3

 

collection-quilt-2-detail-5

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The backing is the same fun unicorn fabric that appears in the front in a different color way.

collection-quilt-2-back

This quilt is the perfect way to learn needle turn appliqué, and I am excited to be teaching it again this year!  Each month we will do a block that build on the skills covered in previous meetings.  If you are interested in joining the class, please contact Sew to Speak in Worthington, Ohio.  This technique opens up a whole new range of quilting designs!

collection-quilt-2-detail-1

Quilt Stats

Title:  The Collection Quilt  (Pattern by Carolyn Friedlander)

Size: 40.5″ x 51.5″

Techniques:  Needle turn appliqué, machine piecing

Quilting:  Computerized linear edge to edge pattern (my original design) done on an A-1 Elite Longarm

Fabric:  Assorted quilt shop quality, 100% cotton fabrics

Batting:  Hobbs 80/20

Thread:  Applique and piecing done with neutral and coordinating Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with 50wt cotton Aurifil

Binding:  Striped bias binding, machine stitched to the front, hand finished on the back.

Crystalized Citrus: A Blogger’s Quilt Festival Entry

Crystalized Citrus is my second entry into The Blogger’s Quilt Festival hosted by Amy’s Creative Side.  I hope you will all set aside some time this week to look at all of the amazing inspiration provided by the festival entries- there is some amazing work on display!

Crystalized Citrus

Crystalized Citrus

I originally created this quilt for this year’s Hoffman Challenge which required the use of this digitally printed butterfly fabric.  I enjoy transforming distinctively patterned fabric into something completely unexpected, so I was excited to transform the butterfly wings to the flesh of citrus fruit.

Hoffman Challenge Fabric

Crystalized Citrus detail

The center of each fruit is improvisationally pieced before being set into the surrounding “skin.”  The entire fruit is then hand appliquéd to the background.  I used matchstick quilting in a range of coordinating colors to ground the pieces on the white background.

Crystalized Citrus

For more about this quilt you can check out the original Crystalized Citrus post.

Columbus Skyline for the Row by Row Experience

This year Dabble and Stitch, a fantastic local quilt shop in Columbus, Ohio asked me to design their row for the Row by Row Experience.  It was their first time participating in this event, and it was my first time designing for it.  I am really excited by the results, and I hope lots of people get to make up this fun block.  During the Row by Row Experience the patterns are available for free in their “home” shop, but can only be distributed by picking them up in person.  Kits for this row are available for $20.  Later this year the pattern will go up for sale and can be sent to you if you can’t make it to the shop.

Columbus Skyline Mini detail

The theme for this year is “Home Sweet Home,” and we thought it would be great to create a row featuring the Columbus skyline.  This view of the city is taken from a bridge in Bicentennial Park.  Columbus Skyline Photo

I was standing right next to this guy as I snapped the photos!Columbus Skyline with Sculpture

Using the photos I took, I designed and rendered the skyline using AutoCad and Photoshop./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Blog/Row By Row/2016/Skyline.dw

The block is constructed using needle turn appliqué, but you can also do raw edge appliqué using this pattern since I included lines on the templates that show the finished sizes of each piece.  This is what the row looks like finished and ready to incorporate with other rows.Columbus Skyline Row

For the shop, I made the row into a mini quilt by adding borders.  The quilting changes from building to building, and for added fun, I quilted the shop name and city into the borders.  I think this looks great as a mini, and I am hoping to make one up as a long pillow for a sofa or bed.Quilted Columbus Skyline Row Mini

I love mixing up my quilting thread colors to match the fabrics on the front of the quilt.  I went with a white fabric on the back to show off all of that quilting.Columbus Skyline Mini back view

If you are traveling through Columbus this summer, I hope you stop in to pick up a pattern!

Quilt Stats

Title:  Columbus Skyline

Size:  Row itself finishes at 9″x36″  With borders the mini finishes at approximately 14.5″x41.5″

Techniques:  Needle-turn Appliqué, Pieced borders

Quilting:  Free motion longarm machine quilted with an A-1 Elite

Fabric:  Assorted 100% Cotton Prints

Batting:  Hobbs 80/20

Thread:  Appliquéd using Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with eight colors of 50wt cotton Aurifil

Binding:  Straight grain binding assembled to match the borders of the mini, cut 2″ wide, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back.