Road Trip Case

This year for the Central Ohio Modern Quilt Guild we did an end of the year gift swap with a mix of  handcrafted and purchased items.  We drew names at the November Meeting, and the person I chose had been eying the Road Trip Case by Noodlehead.  My partner likes Autumnal colors and Alison Glass designs, so I selected a palette  of her batiks and prints.

Road Trip Case Exterior

There are several different pockets and pieces of trim, so it was fun to choose where each fabric would go.  The pattern suggests batting for the quilted case exterior, but I switched it out for Soft and Stable foam, and I’m really pleased with the result.  I incorporated a few lines of walking foot quilting on the exterior using 28wt Aurifil.

Road Trip Case Interior

There are two options for the fabric pockets in the bag; two long or four short.  I wasn’t sure which to go with, but I ended up choosing the shorter pockets since it will most likely be used for sewing notions.  The pocket flaps with hook and loop tape (velcro) closures seemed useful to help contain smallish notions.  I often don’t care for hook and loop tape closers since the hook side can pick up so much fuzz.  I briefly considered replacing the tape with magnetic snaps.  Ultimately, I decided that the velcro allowed more leeway in where the pocket flap could close depending on how full the pocket was.  Hopefully it will work for my partner!

Road Trip Case Pocket detail

The case itself went together fairly easily, and I’m sure if I were to make more it would go quite quickly.  Like most bags, I felt like it took as long to cut out and interface the pieces, as it did to do the actual construction.  The vinyl pocket has the potential to be finicky, but I was pleased how well my machine handled this fabric especially since I don’t have a teflon foot.  I didn’t even end up needing to lay tissue paper over the vinyl while sewing.

The Road Trip Case looks like a great bag for small sewing projects, and would be a fabulous art kit for kids.  This would definitely make a fabulous holiday gift!

Hour Basket Swap

This month one of my local quilt groups, The Columbus Modern Quilters, had a swap of one hour baskets, and I was eager to sign up.  The tutorial we used is by Hearts and Bees, and is available on Craftsy.  I had never made one before, but all it took was one practice basket, and I was hooked!

Hour Basket Exterior

Hour Basket Exterior

My partner listed Carolyn Friedlander as one of her favorite designers, so I thought it would be fun to make a basket entirely with her fabrics.  Flying geese patchwork made up the design on both sides of the basket.

Patchwork panels for an hour basket

Patchwork panels for an hour basket

For the interior, I used a strip of orange fabric that matches the arrows on the exterior of the basket, and finished it off with a wide grid that also coordinates with the basket exterior.

Hour Basket Interior

Hour Basket Interior

The swap was so much fun, and everyone loved the basket they received.  I was delighted that this basket was for me!  This is one of my favorite shades of blue, and it is just perfect for spring!

The Hour Basket that I received in the guild swap

The Hour Basket that I received in the guild swap

This also completes my One Monthly goal entry for March!

 

March One Monthly Goal

This month, one of my local quilt groups, The Columbus Modern Quilters, is having a swap of One Hour Baskets.  I had never made one, and I knew I wanted to incorporate some patchwork, so I made this basket for practice and to look at proportions.

Flying Geese Basket

The pattern is a free download by Hearts and Bees that is available on Craftsy, and it really does go together quickly.  I’m not sure how long it really takes to make one because I incorporated patchwork into the project instead of using single pieces of fabric.  The Annie’s Soft and Stable (not an affiliate link) I used for the project gives the basket a nice structure that feels like it will be very durable and maintain its structure for a long time.  I was pretty happy with the first basket, and I could hardly wait to start on the basket for the swap.  This swap basket is my “One Monthly Goal” for March.

My swap partner listed Carolyn Friedlander as one of her favorite designers, and I thought it would be fun to make a basket using all fabrics from her collections.  The flying geese in the first basket worked really well, so I decided to adapt the idea for the second basket.  With this configuration of fabrics, the geese have a more of an arrow look.

Swap Basket sides

The pieces are cut and the patchwork for the outer panels is finished, so hopefully I’ll have at least one easy finish this month!

 

 

Spring Circle Skirt

Today I have another finish for the Second Quarter Finish Along.  After having this pretty quilter’s cotton for over nine months it was nice to check this project off the list.  This is a fully lined 3/4 circle skirt with a lapped side seam zipper.

Three Quarter Circle Skirt

I like circle skirts because they give a lot of fullness at the hem without any extra bulk at the waist.  What I do not like about circle skirts is the fact that most of the hem is on some degree of bias, so the hem tends to “grow” over time.  I made the skirt several days ago and then let it hang on the dress form for a week before hemming.  My Mom was pressed into service to mark an even line around the outer skirt to create the hemline.  To make sure the hem was as even as possible, I wore the shoes I will most likely wear with this skirt, and the even line was marked from the floor, not the waistband.  After doing a roll hem on the outer skirt, I marked the lining length and hemmed it 3/4″ shorter than the outer layer.  I am hoping that additional “growth” will be minimal since it is only knee length (the weight of longer skirts can cause them to grow more) and the fabrics are fairly sturdy.

This skirt is all ready for my trip to Paducah, KY for the AQS show, so hopefully it will be warm enough to wear this week!

Goal #21 is Finished!

Goal #21 is Finished!

Sewing Apron!

A good sewing apron can make working on a project a lot easier, especially if you are like me- leaving a trail of supplies wherever you go!  This summer I will be working in a theatrical costume shop creating patterns for the clothing worn on stage.  An apron is even more helpful in this communal sewing environment when you not only have your tools laying out, but everyone else’s as well.  My old apron was getting pretty sad after about six years of use, so it was definitely time for something new.

Sewing Apron front view

I have gone through a few aprons over the years, and lately I have liked a half apron tied at the waist rather than a full apron. The last apron I made had a single pocket, and the apron before had about half a dozen different pockets.  For me, having lots of pockets made sense when I was doing wardrobe and needed to have separate areas for different sized safety pins, a threaded needle, scissors, flashlight, etc.  One pocket is fine working in a shop, but I decided to try a different format to mix a large pocket with separate area for scissors, seam rippers, and pencils.

Denim is durable, coordinates with most of my work clothes, and I had some left from a previous project!  I lined it with a pink solid cotton for added durability, and trimmed the whole thing with a bias cut stripe by Lotta Jansdotter.

Sewing Apron back view

One thing that has driven me nuts with previous aprons is how it is difficult to sit down with much of anything in the pocket. Getting poked with scissors is no fun!  I wanted to give this apron just a little bit of fullness so it will fall more naturally when going to sit down.  I didn’t want to gather the denim, so I added a small pleat to each side.  This seams to do the trick- no poking!

Sewing Apron detail

Hopefully this apron will get several years of use- just like its predecessors!

Goal #26 is Finished!

Goal #26 is Finished!

I’m linking up with Sew and Show at Straight Grain this week.  Please stop in to see all of the wonderful work shown there!