Sweet and Simple Chevron Quilt

Today I want to share with you another “Sweet and Simple” quilt.  Like the Hashtag Quilt I shared with you recently, this quilt would be a great quilt for a beginning quilter, or anyone who would like to put together a cute and quick baby quilt.  Chevrons have a classic charm that can go from sweet to sophisticated, and the chevron in this baby quilt is created using half square triangles.

Sweet and Simple Chevron Front View

I chose bright blue and orange, because I adore complementary colors, and this combo is one of my favorites.Sweet and Simple Chevron Detail View

Quilting that emphasizes the chevron design seemed appropriate for the quilt.  I kept the quilting simple in the orange and blue areas, but added extra lines in the white areas to create some additional texture.  I like the look of the quilting pattern on the back of the piece as well, but next time I’m going to seek out a cute print instead of using plain white.  What can I say?- I had it on hand!

Sweet and Simple Chevron Back View

Quilt Stats

Title:  Sweet and Simple Chevron

Size: 32″x41″

Techniques:  Pieced using half square triangles

Quilting:  Echoing Chevron stitching using a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Kona Cotton in White, Doe, and a lovely blue floral print that I have no information for, but would love to have some more- Does anyone recognize it?

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100 in white, Quilted with white Signature Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Bias from a stash fabric cut in 2″ strips, machine stitched to the quilt front and hand stitched to the back


Modern Log Cabin Quilt

When I first decided that I wanted to return to quilting, I wanted to create a piece which had been floating around in the back of my mind for awhile.  Modern Log Cabin Quilt

Several years ago I had been to an exhibit at The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut which included a “potholder” quilt from around the Civil War.  A potholder quilt is created by quilting and binding individual blocks before whip stitching them together to form a quilt.  This technique was popular during the US Civil War for group quilts made to send to soldiers.  Each person working on the project could piece, quilt, and bind individual blocks.  When the group would meet, they could whip stitch the blocks together and quickly produce a finished quilt.

This quilting technique would work well in a modern context because:

  • The individually bound blocks naturally create a quilt which has a design on both the front and back of the quilt- Its like getting two quilts for the work of one!
  • Since much of the design comes from the binding of the blocks, you can really show off some of those gorgeous fabrics that are available to us now.
  • It is completely plausible to quilt even the largest quilts on a domestic sewing machine using this technique since you are only quilting a small portion at a time.
Modern Log Cabin Front View

Front View of “Modern Log Cabin”

I wanted my first project using this method to be fairly straightforward, but I didn’t want to go with a super traditional layout of square blocks either.  I landed on the idea of creating a modern Log Cabin block on a large scale.  Each “log” is its own bound block.

First, I drafted the layout for the quilt.  I planned accent strips (the orange stripes in the finished quilt) to add visual interest and create a natural place to seam fabric together for “logs” longer than the width of the fabric.  (I always try to design in necessary seams when I can!)/Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

Originally, I planned to unite the front and back of the quilt by making the accent pieces the same color as the reverse side of the quilt.  While selecting fabrics, I decided that both sides of the quilt wanted a jolt of color.  I went with an orange from Carolyn Friedlander’s collection since it worked well with both the grey and the blue sides of the quilt./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

For the quilting design I used straight line quilting paired with radiating arcs.Modern Log Cabin Quilting Detail

The binding is cut on the straight grain and each side is bound individually (rather than with mitered corners) as a nod to how quilts were sometimes bound in potholder quilts.  Side note- I still prefer doing bias with mitered corners.  I seriously considered how to join the blocks.  The traditional method would be hand whip stitching (I did this on the quilt Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win), but I wanted to experiment with using a sewing machine, so I selected a triple zig zag stitch.  Modern Log Cabin Detail

This quilt came together pretty easily, and I am really happy with the result.  I finished this quilt back in September, but I hadn’t gotten around to sharing it yet.  Today seemed to be a good day to share because I recently found out that this quilt will be exhibited in the Modern Quilt Category at the American Quilter’s Society Show in Paducah, Kentucky this April!  I have been to this show a few times (and as a high school student had a couple of garments in the fashion show there), but this is the first time I have had a quilt in a major show.  This was an awesome surprise since I almost didn’t enter this quilt!  (I had also entered Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win, which was not accepted even though I thought that it would have a much better chance.  It is so hard to tell what each show is looking for in a given year.  For now, I guess I will keep entering shows with a couple different style quilts and just see what happens- It can’t hurt, right?)

Back View of "Modern Log Cabin"

Back View of “Modern Log Cabin”

Quilt Stats

Title:  Modern Log Cabin

Size:  53″x63″

Techniques:  Bound Blocks (Potholder Technique), Machine Pieced and Quilted

Quilting:  Straight Line and Radiating Arcs

Fabric:  Assorted Cotton Prints

Batting:  Warm and Natural Cotton Batting

Thread:  White Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Cotton print, cut on grain in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

  • Bound block technique
  • On grain binding
  • Binding each side individually (no miters)

I’ll be linking this quilt post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, and Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict.  Please take a few moments to stop in and see all of the lovely projects being shared!


Catch a Falling Star: Mini Quilt #9

Late last week, I was finishing up the top for this starburst quilt, and I couldn’t help saving some of the trimmings from squaring up the sides of the quilt.  I combined these bits of fabric with the extra cut fabric from the quilt to create this mini quilt.

Catch a Falling Star Front Full View

The back of the quilt is also made of scraps from creating the larger quilt.

Catch a Falling Star Back

I have been wanting to do some matchstick quilting, and I thought that this type of quilting would look good with the design of both the front and back of the quilt.  I wanted to use the stitching to draw the various colors throughout the piece, so I selected three different thread colors to help achieve this.Catch a Falling Star Detail

For the binding, I cut Cotton and Steel fabric on the bias so that one row of dots would show along the edge of the quilt front and the back would have a polka dot effect.  While the binding was cut from left over fabric from the starburst quilt, it was the only part of the project not from extra cut pieces.

Catch a Falling Star Back Binding

Quilt Stats

Title:  Catch a Falling Star

Size: 11″x22.25″

Techniques:  Improvisational Piecing

Quilting:  Matchstick quilting done with a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Scrap Prints and Batiks, white Kona Cotton

Batting:  Warm and White cotton batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100 in white.  Quilted using Connecting Threads Essential cotton quilting thread in Magenta, Sangria, and Persimmon.

Binding:  Cotton and Steel fabric, cut on the bias in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

Using scraps exclusively from one larger project

Quilt 9 / 50

Quilt 9 / 50

Goal #8 is Finished!

Goal #8 is Finished!

I’ll be linking this post up with Oh Scrap! at Quilting is More Fun Than Housework and Scraptastic Tuesday at She Can Quilt.  Please stop by to see all of the lovely projects being shared!

Ball Drop Starburst WIP

I have been busily paper piecing away on this quilt over the past couple weeks, and I am really excited to share the finished top.  This quilt was one of my big goals (#16) for the First Quarter Finish Along, so I am really happy to be this far along.  I was hoping to run outside to take a photo of the quilt top out in the snow, but the frigid wind kept trying to blow it away, so I had to settle for indoor photographs today.

Quilt Top Full

 

The close up photos do a slightly better job of showing off the fabrics and colors.

Quilt Top Detail

This quilt was inspired by the first mini quilt in my Mini Quilt Mania Series.  I loved the pattern so much that I scaled up the blocks so I could do this generously sized lap quilt.  At this point in the process the quilt top measures approximately 53″x64″  This is the original quilt which measured 12.5″ x 14.25″ when quilted and bound.  I was a little concerned that I may not like my design as well with the scale adjusted, but I think that the size translation is working pretty well.

Mini #1

Mini #1

The fabric I ordered for the backing finally arrived yesterday so this afternoon I’ll baste this up and start quilting.  I’m hoping to share the finish in a week or two!

I’ll be linking this post up to WIP Wednesday at Freshly Pieced, and Fresh Sewing Day at Lily’s Quilts.  Please check out all of the fantastic works in progress shared there!


Sweet and Simple Hashtag Quilt

My goals for 2015 include developing patterns and teaching quilting classes.  It seems that there is a big call for simple (but not boring) quilts of a manageable size.  I have really been enjoying coming up with a couple sweet and simple quilts that use squares, half square triangles, and strip piecing.  What one symbol is more contemporary than the hashtag?  Hashtag Front

There are four different fabrics in this sweet little quilt.  The main fabric is Kona cotton and there are three different low volume prints that make up the hashtag symbols.Hashtag Front Detail

I chose to quilt this project with a quarter circle arc.  This shape resembles the wifi symbol, and therefore connects with the dominant symbol of the hashtag.

Hashtag Back

In retrospect, I wish I had used a print on the back of the quilt to mix things up a bit.  Of course this quilt goes together so easily and looks so cute, I may have to make a few more!

Back Detail

Quilt Stats

Title:  Sweet and Simple Hashtag

Size:  40″x40″

Techniques:  Machine pieced, Machine Quilted

Quilting:  Echoing Quarter Circle Arc pattern done with a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Kona Cotton and Low Volume Prints

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted with Connecting Threads Essential Cotton Quilting thread in Sangria

Binding:  Kona Cotton matching the quilt background, cut on the bias in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back.

I am linking this post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict, Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She, and Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts.  Please stop by to see all of the lovely work being shared!