Embellished Spring: Mini Quilt #12

Spring is finally here- and a couple days in the past week have actually felt like it around here!  What a great time to start thinking about incorporating flowers into some projects.  Large floral print fabric is becoming one of my favorite things to look for when I go to quilt shops or shows.  I recently picked up some Amy Butler prints at a show, and I am so excited to embellish them with some hand embroidery!Embellished Spring Front

This flower is from the Organic Soul line, and I hand appliquéd it to a piece of Carolyn Friedlander fabric.  I really liked placing such an organic shape against a highly linear pattern.  The fun part was doing hand embroidery to enhance the dimension of the piece.Embellished Spring Detail

The backing is another Amy Butler print, and the quilting is a free motion design which loosely replicates the shape of the appliquéd flower.  The uneven stripe fabric on the binding is a Lotta Jansdotter design cut on the bias.Embellished Spring Back

Quilt Stats

Title:  Embellished Spring

Size:  10″x10″

Techniques: Hand appliqué, hand embroidery

Quilting:  Free motion in a design mirroring the flower and leaves of the appliqué design

Fabrics:  Flower appliqué and quilt backing are Amy Butler designs, Background by Carolyn Friedlander, binding by Lotta Jansdotter

Batting:  Warm and White cotton batting

Thread:  Appliqué done with navy Gutermann  Mara 100; Quilting done with cotton Connecting Threads Essential in Peridot, Persian Blue, and Persimmon; Embroidery created with assorted DMC flosses and hand dyed floss from Artfabrik by Laura Wasilowski.

Binding:  2″ wide strips, cut on the bias, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

Extensive embroidery used to create dimension on a pre-printed design.

Quilt 12 / 50

Quilt 12 / 50

Goal #11 is Finished!

Goal #11 is Finished!

I’m sharing this post at Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She, Fabric Tuesday at Quilt Story, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict, and Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts.  Please stop by to see all of the lovely sewing being done!


Pi Day: Mini Quilt #11

Happy π Day!  Best wishes for peace, hope, and joy during the glorious season of pi day- Who can’t get behind a holiday that requires the consumption of pie!  There are so many kinds of pie you could celebrate with . . . fruit pie, cream pie, ice cream pie, chocolate pie . . .  Or a savory pie . . . pot pie, shepherd’s pie, pizza pie, quiche . . . Okay now I’m hungry.  I thought that the best way to celebrate such a wonderful day would be to make a mini quilt that could serve as a pie plate mat.π, pi, PIE! Front

I knew I wanted to do a circular mini quilt, and a pie motif seemed too perfect to pass up.  I pieced a “lattice” top and then used a bias cut strip of fabric to create the outer edge of the “crust.”  I had never attempted curving a bias strip around the edge of a full circle, but this worked out well (a great deal of steam was involved).

Today is a particularly special π Day since twice today we will have seven digits past the decimal point align with the date and time.  3.1415926 translates to March (month 3) Day (14th) Year (’15) and Time (9:26 am & pm).  To commemorate this once in a lifetime event I decided to embroider these numbers to my mini quilt.π, pi, PIE! embroidery detail

The backing and binding fabric is a grey print- think tin pie plate.  For the quilting I decided to keep it simple by stitching around the edge of each red square in the lattice work.  Of course “simple” involved a whole lot of thread tails to bury- maybe I should have thought that through a bit more!  But since I like the result, we’ll say it was worth it!π, pi, PIE! back

Now to see the pie mat in action:

Coconut Pie with Meringue Topping- I adore Meringue.Coconut Pie

Cherry Pie.

Cherry Pie

Quilt Stats

Title: π, pi, PIE!

Size:  14″ Diameter.  3.1415926 x 14″ = 43.98229″ Circumference

Techniques:  Machine Piecing

Quilting:  Machine quilting- stitching in the ditch

Fabrics:  Red: Batik, Tan: Print from Carolyn Friedlander’s “Doe” line, Grey: Lonni Rossi print from Andover Fabrics

Batting:  Hobbs Heirloom Bleached Cotton Batting

Thread: Pieced with white Gutermann Mara 100, Quilted using Mettler cotton quilting thread in red

Binding:  Bias in coordinating grey fabric, cut in 2″ strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

Adding a strip of bias around a circle and pressing it flat (other than bias binding)

Quilt 11 / 50

Quilt 11 / 50

Goal #10 is Finished!

Goal #10 is Finished!

I’m linking up with Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, and Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation.  Please stop in to see all of the fantastic work being done!

Sweet and Simple Chevron Quilt

Today I want to share with you another “Sweet and Simple” quilt.  Like the Hashtag Quilt I shared with you recently, this quilt would be a great quilt for a beginning quilter, or anyone who would like to put together a cute and quick baby quilt.  Chevrons have a classic charm that can go from sweet to sophisticated, and the chevron in this baby quilt is created using half square triangles.

Sweet and Simple Chevron Front View

I chose bright blue and orange, because I adore complementary colors, and this combo is one of my favorites.Sweet and Simple Chevron Detail View

Quilting that emphasizes the chevron design seemed appropriate for the quilt.  I kept the quilting simple in the orange and blue areas, but added extra lines in the white areas to create some additional texture.  I like the look of the quilting pattern on the back of the piece as well, but next time I’m going to seek out a cute print instead of using plain white.  What can I say?- I had it on hand!

Sweet and Simple Chevron Back View

Quilt Stats

Title:  Sweet and Simple Chevron

Size: 32″x41″

Techniques:  Pieced using half square triangles

Quilting:  Echoing Chevron stitching using a walking foot on a Bernina 1008

Fabrics:  Kona Cotton in White, Doe, and a lovely blue floral print that I have no information for, but would love to have some more- Does anyone recognize it?

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting

Thread:  Pieced using Gutermann Mara 100 in white, Quilted with white Signature Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Bias from a stash fabric cut in 2″ strips, machine stitched to the quilt front and hand stitched to the back


Winter Trees: Mini Quilt #10

Last Fall I purchased a small amount of a Cotton and Steel Print by Sarah Watts (from the August collection), and when I cut some of it into strips for another project I made the pleasant discovery that this fabric really looks like Birch bark.  Naturally, I went and bought more immediately!  I am really excited to make use of this fabric in an improvisationally pieced tree quilt.Winter Trees Front View

I found a stash Kona cotton in a color that was very close to the color of the teal green splotches in the tree print which worked perfectly as the background fabric.  I started by cutting a rectangle of the general size I was thinking about and then used a straight edge and rotary cutter to slash the fabric where the trees and branches would go.  No measuring involved! (at least at this point-)

Winter Trees Process

I went with a fabric from Carolyn Friedlander’s Botanics line for the backing because I liked incorporating the leaf imagery.

Winter Trees Back View

For the quilting design, I wanted to evoke a feeling of winter.  While I’m not generally a big fan of snow, especially this time of year, I do like watching great big fluffy snowflakes fall into drifts.  I decided to use a quilting design of various size bubbles in light blue to give that winter snow storm feeling.Winter Trees Front Detail

The binding is a slate colored piece from Jan Patek’s Front Porch line.  I knew this little quilt wanted a striped binding, and it was fun to find a fabric from such a different line than Cotton and Steel, and make them play together so nicely.  I’m considering doing one of these little tree quilts for every season . . .

Quilt Stats

Title:  Winter Trees

Size:  15.5″ x 19″

Techniques:  Improvisational Piecing

Quilting:  Stitch in the ditch along the edges of the tree shapes, free motion quilting in a bubble motif

Fabrics:  Sarah Watts (Cotton and Steel- August Collection), Carolyn Friedlander (Botanics), Kona Cotton, Jan Patek (Front Porch)

Batting:  Warm and White Cotton Batting

Thread:  Connecting Threads Essential Thread in Persian Blue,  light blue cotton machine quilting thread

Binding:  2″ wide strips, cut on grain, machine stitched to the quilt front, hand stitched to the back.

What was new:

“Tree” Improv!  I have never done improv piecing with the intention of making it look like a particular object.

Quilt 10 / 50

Quilt 10 / 50

Goal #9 is Finished!

Goal #9 is Finished!

I’m linking this post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts.  Please stop by to check out everyone’s awesome work!

Modern Log Cabin Quilt

When I first decided that I wanted to return to quilting, I wanted to create a piece which had been floating around in the back of my mind for awhile.  Modern Log Cabin Quilt

Several years ago I had been to an exhibit at The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut which included a “potholder” quilt from around the Civil War.  A potholder quilt is created by quilting and binding individual blocks before whip stitching them together to form a quilt.  This technique was popular during the US Civil War for group quilts made to send to soldiers.  Each person working on the project could piece, quilt, and bind individual blocks.  When the group would meet, they could whip stitch the blocks together and quickly produce a finished quilt.

This quilting technique would work well in a modern context because:

  • The individually bound blocks naturally create a quilt which has a design on both the front and back of the quilt- Its like getting two quilts for the work of one!
  • Since much of the design comes from the binding of the blocks, you can really show off some of those gorgeous fabrics that are available to us now.
  • It is completely plausible to quilt even the largest quilts on a domestic sewing machine using this technique since you are only quilting a small portion at a time.
Modern Log Cabin Front View

Front View of “Modern Log Cabin”

I wanted my first project using this method to be fairly straightforward, but I didn’t want to go with a super traditional layout of square blocks either.  I landed on the idea of creating a modern Log Cabin block on a large scale.  Each “log” is its own bound block.

First, I drafted the layout for the quilt.  I planned accent strips (the orange stripes in the finished quilt) to add visual interest and create a natural place to seam fabric together for “logs” longer than the width of the fabric.  (I always try to design in necessary seams when I can!)/Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

Originally, I planned to unite the front and back of the quilt by making the accent pieces the same color as the reverse side of the quilt.  While selecting fabrics, I decided that both sides of the quilt wanted a jolt of color.  I went with an orange from Carolyn Friedlander’s collection since it worked well with both the grey and the blue sides of the quilt./Users/cassandra_ireland/Desktop/Portfolio/Misc. Projects/Quilt

For the quilting design I used straight line quilting paired with radiating arcs.Modern Log Cabin Quilting Detail

The binding is cut on the straight grain and each side is bound individually (rather than with mitered corners) as a nod to how quilts were sometimes bound in potholder quilts.  Side note- I still prefer doing bias with mitered corners.  I seriously considered how to join the blocks.  The traditional method would be hand whip stitching (I did this on the quilt Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win), but I wanted to experiment with using a sewing machine, so I selected a triple zig zag stitch.  Modern Log Cabin Detail

This quilt came together pretty easily, and I am really happy with the result.  I finished this quilt back in September, but I hadn’t gotten around to sharing it yet.  Today seemed to be a good day to share because I recently found out that this quilt will be exhibited in the Modern Quilt Category at the American Quilter’s Society Show in Paducah, Kentucky this April!  I have been to this show a few times (and as a high school student had a couple of garments in the fashion show there), but this is the first time I have had a quilt in a major show.  This was an awesome surprise since I almost didn’t enter this quilt!  (I had also entered Low Volume Fail, Pastel Win, which was not accepted even though I thought that it would have a much better chance.  It is so hard to tell what each show is looking for in a given year.  For now, I guess I will keep entering shows with a couple different style quilts and just see what happens- It can’t hurt, right?)

Back View of "Modern Log Cabin"

Back View of “Modern Log Cabin”

Quilt Stats

Title:  Modern Log Cabin

Size:  53″x63″

Techniques:  Bound Blocks (Potholder Technique), Machine Pieced and Quilted

Quilting:  Straight Line and Radiating Arcs

Fabric:  Assorted Cotton Prints

Batting:  Warm and Natural Cotton Batting

Thread:  White Cotton Machine Quilting Thread

Binding:  Cotton print, cut on grain in 2″ wide strips, machine stitched to the front, hand stitched to the back

What was new:

  • Bound block technique
  • On grain binding
  • Binding each side individually (no miters)

I’ll be linking this quilt post up with Sew Cute Tuesday at Blossom Heart Quilts, Let’s Bee Social at Sew Fresh Quilts, Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation, and Whoop Whoop Friday at Confessions of a Fabric Addict.  Please take a few moments to stop in and see all of the lovely projects being shared!